Saturday, December 18, 2010

Are You A Marine Surveyor ?

video

March 2011 Marine Survey Class



Introduction to the Art of Marine Survey -Yachts and Small Craft



7 to 11 March 2011 – 0830 to 1700


Nordby Conference Center – Fishermen’s Terminal


Seattle, Washington



Monday



- Welcome and course introduction


- Marine survey and the role of the marine surveyor


- Accreditation societies (SAMS, NAMS)


- Request for services


- Vessel types and descriptions


- Nature of observations and findings


- Use of USCG Navigation - Vessel Inspections Circulars (NVIC) as guidance in


marine survey work.


- Lunch (1200 – 1300)


- Tools used in marine survey work


- Galvanic Corrosion


- Wooden vessel construction, deficiencies, and inspection techniques –




Tuesday



- Recap of previous day


- Wooden vessel construction, deficiencies, and inspection techniques


- Wooden vessel fastenings and inspection techniques


- Observation and recommendations regarding refastening


- Fiberglass vessel construction, deficiencies, and inspection techniques


- Use of electronic moisture meters


- Lunch (1200 – 1300)


- Steel and aluminum vessel construction, deficiencies, and NDT inspection


- Electrical Systems



Wednesday



- Recap of previous day


- Vessel safety systems, lifesaving devices, and regulations


(USCG Auxiliary, Zenith Maritime).


- Sail rig inspection


- Lunch (1200 – 1300)


- Overview of damage surveys


- Marine machinery inspection


- Review of ABYC, NFPA, and CFR standards and recommended practices


- Commercial vessel inspection – passenger and fishing (flag administration


classification and certification schemes – regulations - USCG, DNV)



Thursday



- Recap of previous day


- Vessel stability observations – Capt. David Yell


- Survey reports – content and use of work product by clients, marine lenders,


insurance underwriters, and marine trade professional


- Lunch (1200 – 1300)


- Review of survey reports – nature of minimum content


- Value surveys (Fair Market Value – Best and Highest Use – Comparative Sales)



Friday



- Recap of previous day


- Boat yard – marina inspections


- Lunch (1200 – 1300)


- Preparation of group reports on findings


- Presentation of group reports


- Presentation of Certificates of Completion



Materials (supplied) –



- Student study guide – Zenith Maritime and guest speakers


- Surveying Fiberglass Sail Boats, Henry Mustin


- Federal Requirements for Recreational and Fishing Vessels - USCG




Recommended Reading –



- Surveying Small Craft, Ian Nicolson – Sheridan House


- Metal Corrosion in Boats, Nigel Warren – International Marine Publishing


- The Nature of Boats, David Gerr - International Marine Publishing


- Details of Classic Boat Construction, The Hull – Larry Pardey – Waterline Books


- ABYC – Standards and Recommended Practices for Yachts and Small Craft – American


Yacht and Boat Council


- National Fire Protection Association 10/302 – NFPA


- 33 CFR Subchapter S – Boating Safety (Parts 173 – 199), 46 CFR Subchapter C –


Uninspected Vessels (Parts 24 to 28), 46 CFR Subchapter T – Inspected Small Passenger


Vessels (Parts 175 to 185).




Classroom Location -



Nordby Conference Center, Fishermen’s Terminal – Seattle, Washington.


The Nordby Building (just east of the main terminal building – towards net sheds) – conference room is on north side of building (facing boat basin).


3919 18th Ave West


Seattle, Washington 98119


Monday, December 13, 2010

Fuel Hoses.....


- Flexible fuel hose used in marine applications must meet the requirements of SAE J1527 and must be marked as such (ABYC H-24 and H-33). Flexible fuel hose for marine use is rated for specific applications using a letter – number combination. The United States Coast Guard (USCG) has designated four types of marine fuel hoses – viz., A1, A2, B1, and B2. The USCG requires fuel hose approved for marine applications to be marked “USCG Approved Type __” every twelve (12) inches – along with the date of manufacture (see photograph below of a section of USCG Approved A1 marine fuel hose which is marked fire and alcohol resistant). ABYC Sections H-24 and H-33 specifies fuel hose types and usage for gasoline and diesel fuel systems. Newer alcohol based fuels will cause older approved hoses to deteriorate and leak. Each flexible fuel hose end must be secured by a swaged sleeve, and sleeve – threaded insert, or a corrosion resistant hose clamp. Note – not all Type A hose is designed to be clamped.



Type A1 hose is for critical fuel delivery applications for both gasoline and diesel fuel products due to its good fire resistance and low permeation characteristics. 33 CFR 183 requires that A1 or A1-15 hose be used for inboard gasoline machinery fuel systems. ABYC H-33 recommends either A1 or A2 for diesel fuel applications within engine compartments. Type A1, A1-15, and A2 hose is required and or recommended for vent and fill applications. Type B1 and B2 fuel hose is also recommended for use as vent and fill hose outside the engine compartment where a break in fuel systems will not result in the discharge of not more than five (5) ounces of fuel in 2-1/2 minutes. All fuel delivery, fill, and vent hoses must be of proper specifications. The use of non-marine grade hoses, such as used in automobiles, is not recommended. Gasoline and diesel fuels have a profound effect on hoses. Fuel hoses should routinely wiped with a clean, dry cloth to check for excessive fuel order which could indicate leakage.


Friday, October 22, 2010

Strait of Megellan Blogspot

I like to welcome Capt Robert Reeder to cyberspace - please visit his new blog at http://wwwstraitofmagellan.blogspot.com. Robert is a well trained practitioner of marginal maritime advice and I encourage all of you to follow his exploits.

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Zenith Maritime Services

What do we do (Seattle and Nation wide)?

· Yachts and Commercial Vessels Marine Surveys
· SAMS & ABYC
· Hull and Machinery
· Steel, Aluminum, Wood, Fiberglass
· Fastener Inspection
· UT Gauging – Coating Thickness Measurements
· Vessel Stability
· Consulting
· USCG and DNV Classed Vessels
· Marine Survey Classes and Training
· USCG Approved License Training AB to Master 200
survey@zenithmaritime.com – 360.471.6148

METAL BOAT SOCIETY FESTIVAL SPONSOR

PORT TOWNSEND WOODEN BOAT FESTIVAL SPONSOR

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Metal Boat Society - August 21th - Port Angeles, Washington

I am speaking on Saturday, 21 August at the Metal Boat Society gathering at Port Angeles - here's my notes for my talk on surveying metal boats -

Metal Boat Survey Notes

aka

Preventive Metallurgy

Deficiencies –

Wastage – Erosion - Corrosion (physical - chemical – electrical) – stray current and galvanic.

Hull – Framing Damage (dents, buckling between frames, notches)

Weld Seams – decay and faying surface corrosion (between hull shell and frame) from incomplete welds (usually a concern in recreational vessels).

Non-marine metal alloys

Inspection –

Visual and tactile observations

Percussion testing

Gauging – UT or Borings

Probing

Hull Potential

Steel Vessels -

NVIC 7-86 Inspection and Repair of Steel Vessels

Relative Inexpensive – good build strength – doesn’t fatigue easily

Iron and Mild Steel (carbon steel) – rusts, wastes away in submerged in seawater at about the same rate. In still seawater, unprotected steel wastes at a rate of about 7 mils per year – so 1/8” (0.125”) hull plate will last about 24 years. In the splash zone wastes away at about 15 mils per year. An additional 2-knot current will increase wastage to 2X to 3X.

Subject to galvanic corrosion, impingement (erosion), and weld decay.

Protection Schemes – Coating (paints, epoxy, fiberglass), galvanizing, dry, Cor-Ten alloys, cathodic or impressed current protection. Remove all rust – don’t paint over flaking rust (galvanic cell – rust oxide is about 0.3 volts more noble).

Stainless Steel –

Expensive

Stainless – is just stainless not stain-proof. The addition of chromium (> 10%) increases resistance to corrosion due to the tight layer of surface oxidation (passive state). Marine grade stainless is austenitic (non-magnetic iron).

Subject to corrosion in active state (no O2 acts like iron “crevice” - and w/o zincs in saltwater “pitting”), weld corrosion, stress and corrosion fatigue.

Marine Grades 304 and 316 for deck fittings but suffer from pitting corrosion when submerged in still sea water.

Questionable alloy content in foreign made fittings, stainless plated brass/bronze castings.

Protection Schemes – expose to flowing water, air, cathodic protection.

Unprotected Galvanic Potential – 316 (active) 570 to 680 mv DC, 930 to 1030 (passive) - (zinc reference cell).

Aluminum Alloys –

ABYC Project T-1 and NVIC 11-80 deals with aluminum vessels.

Marine grades are 5000 and 6000 series – hull plate is from the 5000 (magnesium) and extrusions are 6000 (magnesium and silicon).

Hull plating - 5083 (higher weld strength) or 5086 H-116 (highest corrosion resistance) – for structural members 6061 T-6 (most common) or 6063 T-6.

High strength to weight/thickness ratio.

Fatigues easier than steel – prone to stress corrosion cracking (notches – sharp bends). Alkaline will cause aluminum corrosion – so better to protected using zinc anodes rather than magnesium (more electrically active).

Prone to poultice corrosion.

Aluminum is low on the galvanic scale – all other marine metals are a concern.

Protection Schemes – coating (barrier coat), cathodic protection, avoid direct contact with dissimilar metals.

Copper Alloys -

Brasses (Cu/Zn) – yellow, Admiralty (70/30), Naval Brass or Tobin Bronze (60/40) – all subject to alloy breakdown (dezincification – addition of tin/arsenic, helps to reduce galvanic protection), stress cracking.

Manganese bronze commonly used in propellers, shafts, deck fittings is a high Zn brass (40%) with the addition of manganese to increase strength. Bronze and Cu/Ni Alloys (Zn free Cu alloys containing tin) – aluminum (90% Cu – 10% Al), silicon (3% silicon) – not subject to dezincification, Cu/Ni alloys (strong and resists corrosion).

Present day bronzes can have questionable alloy content.

Protection Schemes – selective use, cathodic protection.

Protection Strategies -

Coat - paint metals especially in galvanic cells. Thoroughly coat weld seams.

Good housekeeping – remove debris, tools, fasteners, etc - especially in bilges – spaces – voids – framing members.

If dissimilar metals are causing unwanted corrosion – then one or more of the following should be done –

Electrically isolate dissimilar metals.

Select metals that are close to each other on the galvanic chart. If a coating is used, then use it on the cathode (the metal which is not going to corrode) because coating the zinc anode will reduce its surface area. Reduce the area of the cathode not the anode.

Change the potential between metals (anodes – impressed current systems).

Properly wire vessels to ABYC standards – no ground and neutral lines connected.

Watch for stray current issues. Use galvanic isolator (double diode bridge) – transformer.

Cathodic Protection -

Every boat is a battery – some larger, some smaller.

In marine environments – we struggle everyday with galvanic corrosion and cathodic protection.

The problem - the corrosion (and resultant damage) that occurs at the anode of a galvanic cell is caused by the flow of electronics (galvanic current) from the anode to the cathode through an electrolyte. Usually – the damaging galvanic potential is less than 1 volt DC.

In 1824, Sir Humphrey Davy mounted iron anodes on the copper hull sheathing of the HMS Samarang to prevent the copper from corroding.

The plan – reduction or prevention of corrosion of a metal by either coating and or making it cathodic by the use of sacrificial anodes or impressed current to change the protected metal’s potential voltage by at least 200mv DC.

ABYC Project E2, Table II
Recommended Range of Cathodic Protection
(AG/AGCL reference cell in sea water flowing at 8 to 13 ft/sec, temperature range 50 to 80˚F)

Fiberglass Hulls

-550 to -1100mv

Wood Hulls

-550 to -600mv

Aluminum Hulls

-950 to -1100mv

Steel Hulls

-850 to -1100mv

Non-metallic Hulls with Aluminum Drives

-950 to – 1100mv

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Pulling Steel Boat Nails





video

The best method to remove steel boat nails - spikes is to tack weld a carriage bolt onto the exposed end of the fastener (I use a small inverter welder and 1/16" rod to tack weld a 1/4" X 3" carriage bolt - I like the flat head of the carriage bolt as it mates to the pulling hook on the slide hammer). This trick works well - but be extremely carefully not to catch the planks on fire and or tear up the boat (watch for plank - frame movement). If the fastener does not want to move - leave it alone. If and when it comes out - inspection is straight forward. I usually use hot dipped lag screws to replace removed fasteners. Make sure to check the frame for condition and serviceability (does the fastener harden up in the frame).

Survey Class Schedule

Introduction to the Art of Marine Survey -Yachts and Small Craft

28 June to 2 July 2010 – 0830 to 1700

Nordby Conference Center – Fishermen’s Terminal

Seattle, Washington

Monday

- Welcome and course introduction

- Marine survey and the role of the marine surveyor

- Accreditation societies (SAMS, NAMS)

- Vessel types and descriptions

- Nature of observations and findings

- Lunch

- Tools used in marine survey work

- Wooden vessel construction, deficiencies, and inspection techniques – guest speaker

- Wooden vessel fastenings

Tuesday

- Recap of previous day

- Wooden vessel fastening inspection techniques

- Observation and recommendations regarding refastening

- Galvanic Corrosion

- Lunch

- Galvanic Corrosion

- Use of USCG Navigation - Vessel Inspections Circulars (NVIC) as guidance in survey work

- Fiberglass vessel construction, deficiencies, and inspection techniques

- Use of electronic moisture meters

- Observations

Wednesday

- Recap of previous day

- Steel and aluminum vessel construction, deficiencies, and inspection techniques

- Use of ultrasonic NDT hull shell thickness measurements

- Vessel stability observations

- Sail rig inspection – guest speaker

- Lunch

- Overview of damage surveys

- Review of ABYC, NFPA, and CFR standards and recommended practices for yachts and small craft

- Commercial vessel inspection – passenger and fishing (flag administration classification and certification schemes – regulations - USCG, DNV, ABS, Lloyds)

Thursday

- Recap of previous day

- Marine machinery inspection – guest speaker

- Lunch

- Survey reports – content and use of work product by clients, marine lenders, insurance underwriters, and marine trade professional – guest speakers

- Review of survey reports – nature of minimum content

- Value surveys (Fair Market Value – Best and Highest Use – Comparative Sales)

Friday

- Recap of previous day

- Boat yard inspections

- Lunch

- Preparation of group reports on findings

- Presentation of group reports

- Presentation of Certificates of Completion

Cost: USD$ 500.00/pp (includes training materials) – please register and pay online at www.zenithmaritime.com. Please click on registration tab at home page – enter marine survey class in location field. Registration –