Friday, March 27, 2009

Gone Down South...

Away from my computer for the next 10 days....John

Anchored by the Stern was the problem

Cause of the Florida boat accident reported yesterday in the Seattle Times....



http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/sports/2008935327_lostboat28.html

Top 10 troubles in SPVs

The purpose of this analysis was to identify the 10 most common deficiencies to help Small Passenger Vessel Owners by shedding some light on vessel problems that they can rectify prior to scheduling their next Coast Guard examination.
The top 10 deficiencies, including a brief explanation of the deficiency, applicable regulation, and potential correction methods are provided below. These deficiencies are not listed in any specific order.
Additional information regarding Domestic Vessel Inspection is available on the Sector’s Homeport website at http://homeport.uscg.mil/sene.
More information can be found under the Domestic Vessels (Streamlined Inspection Program) section at the following website to assist you with performing a self inspection of your passenger vessel prior to your annual Coast Guard examination: http://homeport.uscg.mil/
LIGHT GUARDS MISSINGAll light fixtures that may be subject to damage must have a guard or be made of high strength material. Light fixtures on the open weather deck, engine room, or other machinery space must be protected with guards. Lights in accommodation spaces are normally exempted from this requirementbecause they are not subject to damage. (46 CFR 183.410)
EPIRB HYDROSTATIC RELEASE EXPIREDAll small passenger vessels that are certificated to operate on the high seas or three miles beyond the coastline of the Great Lakes must have a FCC Type Accepted Category 1, 406 MHz Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacon (EPIRB) installed in a float free system on board the vessel.The Marine Inspectors discovered that many small passenger vessels failed to replace the hydrostatic release prior to its expiration date. Vessel owners/operators should inspect their EPIRBs routinely and ensure that they operate properly. The hydrostatic release unit for the EPIRB must be replaced prior to expiration to ensure that it will successfully release the EPIRB should the vessel sink. (46 CFR 180.64)
NAVIGATION CHARTS OUTDATED OR MISSINGAll certificated small passenger vessels must carry appropriate navigational charts that cover the area in which they operate. These charts must be kept current using regularly published Notices to Mariners. Many vessels that received deficiencies for outdated or missing navigation charts were also found to be missing other required nautical publications which include the U.S. Coast Pilot, Coast Guard Light List, Tide Tables, and Current Tables. Vessels may use extracts from these publications in lieu of maintaining the complete publication on their vessel. (46 CFR 184.420)
EXPIRED FIRST AID KIT MEDICATIONAll certificated small passenger vessels must have a first aid kit approved under 33 CFR 160.041 or one that contains all required contents listed in 160.041. The most common deficiency with first aid kits is expired medications. When an expired medication is discovered, it must be replaced promptly. Individual items in CG approved first aid kits may be replaced as necessary with equivalent medications. Just because one item in a first aid kit is expired does not mean that the whole kit must be replaced! (46 CFR 184.710 & 33 CFR 160.041)
DEAD END WIRESAll cables or wires must serve some piece of equipment or system onboard the vessel. In situations where a piece of equipment or system is removed and not replaced, the cable or wire that serviced the equipment or system must also be properly removed from the power supply. (46 CFR 183.340)
DETERIORATED HULL MATERIALRoutine examinations of a vessel’s hull both internally and externally are critical to the safety of a vessel. Wood vessels are notorious for having wasted wood planking and deteriorated fasteners. Steel and Aluminum hulled vessels are prone to get cracked welds following allisions with objects such as docks and also due to routine operations in rough seas. Steel is also prone to rusting, especially in areas where the plating is uncoated or where the coating may have failed. Fiberglass hulled vessels are also subject to hull deterioration due to delamination, blisters, or cracks/knicks in the gel coat which can allow water to permeate through the various layers of fiberglass and weaken the hullstructure. Vessel owners/operators should make a concerted effort to examine all accessible internal hull components including through hull fittings on a regular basis. Identifying problems early can prevent costly repairs or even major hull damage in the future. (46 CFR 189.40; NVIC 7-68; NVIC 8-87; NVIC 7-95)
INOPERABLE BILGE ALARMAll certificated small passenger vessels greater than 26 feet, regardless of build date, must have visual and audible bilge high level alarms for normally unmanned spaces that might flood, whether from a fractured through-hull fitting below the deepest load waterline, spaces containing charged sea water sea water piping, and spaces with a non-watertight closure, such as a space with a non-watertight hatch on the main deck. Vessels constructed of wood must also provide bilge level alarms in allwatertight compartments except small buoyancy chambers. Testing bilge level alarms and visual indicators are relatively easy to perform and should be conducted on a regular basis to ensure proper operation of the bilge alarm system. (46 CFR 182.530)
PORTABLE HAND BILGE PUMP MISSING OR INOPERABLEAs per Table 182.520(a), specific small passenger vessels are permitted to have portable hand bilge pumps as a secondary or emergency means of dewatering a space. In many of the examination activities reviewed, vessel owners failed to maintain a portable pump onboard but in most ofthe activities, the portable pump was either inoperable or not usable in all spaces of the vessel. The regulations require that the portable hand bilge pump be capable of pumping water from all watertight compartments on the vessel which means that the suction hose must be long enough to reachthe deepest part of the vessel. Vessel owners or operators should test their portable hand bilge pumps on a regular basis to ensure proper operation. (46 CFR 182.520(b))
FCC STATION LICENSE MISSINGMarine Radios, EPIRBs, and AIS equipment required to be installed on small passenger vessels must comply with FCC requirements including FCC issued station licenses mandated in 47 CFR 8.13. Many certificated small passenger vessels are issued deficiencies for not having an FCC StationLicense for their marine radio. (46 CFR 184.502 & 47 CFR 80.13)
NAVIGATION LIGHTS INOPERABLEAll vessels must have navigation lights in accordance with the International and Inland Navigation Rules. During safety examinations, many vessels are found to have inoperable stern, mast, and sidelights. In some instances the installation of these lights was also found to conflictwith the International and Inland Navigation Rules. Vessels of greater than 65 feet in length must also have navigation lights that are compliant with UL 1104 standards. Though many vessels normally operate in daylight hours only, vessel owners/operators should test their navigational lightsprior to each voyage to ensure proper operation. (46 CFR 183.420)

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Merchant Mariners Credentials

The U.S. Coast Guard's Marine Safety, Security and Stewardship Directorate announced March 16 the publication of a final rule consolidating regulations for the issuance of merchant mariner qualification credentials.The changes simplify the existing merchant mariner qualification credentialing process by reducing the number of credentials a mariner will need to hold. The rule also eliminates redundant regulatory burdens and government processes. Mariners who self-identify when applying for Transportation Worker Identification Credentials will no longer need to appear in person at a Coast Guard Regional Exam Center when applying for a new, renewal or upgrade credential.This rulemaking works in tandem with the joint final rule published in Jan. 2007 by the Coast Guard and the Transportation Security Administration on Transportation Worker Identification Credential implementation in the maritime sector.This final rule follows consideration of public comments on its potential impact. The final rule and related materials may be reviewed at www.regulations.gov, docket number: USCG-2006-24371.

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Commandant's Blog .... iCommandant

Today...I received the following email from LCDR Russell regarding the Commandants blog - what a great idea...thanks LCDR Russell for the heads up!

John,

I stumbled across you blog today.

If you aren't already, thought you might want to be aware of the Commandant's blog, iCommandant.

Taking a look at your interests, I grabbed a couple of his posts that you might be interested in:

http://www.uscg.mil/comdt/blog/2009/03/state-of-coast-guard-address-q.asp#links

http://www.uscg.mil/comdt/blog/2009/02/coast-guard-working-to-clear-mariner.asp#links

For some background on this engagement effort you can read his first blog and watch his video on it. http://www.uscg.mil/comdt/blog/2008/09/introducing-commandants-corner-20-and.asp#links


LCDR Russell

CG Under the Microscope...

From Maritime News

Yesterday, March 24, Congressman Elijah E. Cummings (D-Md.), Chairman of the House Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation, convened the Subcommittee to examine steps the Coast Guard has taken to reform and strengthen the policies and procedures it utilizes to manage acquisition processes.Specifically, the hearing examined the extent to which the Coast Guard will be positioned to exercise effective oversight of acquisition efforts as a result of new reforms implemented in response to extensive criticism of its management of the $24b Deepwater program. Over the past two years, the Coast Guard has moved to restructure its acquisition management systems, creating an Acquisition Directorate and developing a “Blueprint for Acquisition Reform.” Additionally, it is developing individual cost and schedule baselines for each of the acquisition projects contained in the Deepwater program.The hearing also included discussion of the Coast Guard Acquisition Reform Act of 2009, new legislation that Congressman Cummings will be introducing today to build on the Coast Guard’s acquisition reform efforts by creating a Chief Acquisition Officer position, barring the Coast Guard’s use of lead systems integrators, and requiring the development of independent life-cycle cost estimates and testing and evaluation plans for the largest acquisition programs.

Seattle M100/OUPV License Class

FYI - I have a few open seats for my upcoming Master's and OUPV class starting April 7th at Fishermen's Terminal - Seattle. This will be an evening class (T-W-Th 6 - 10pm) for 7 weeks. If interested - give me a yell. John

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Monday, March 23, 2009

Boater's World - Toast

Boating and fishing retailer Boater’s World has begun a chainwide going-out-of-business sale at its 129 locations, including one in Portland.
Boater’s World was founded in 1987 by Ritz Camera, which filed for bankruptcy reorganization last month, partly blaming a drop in business at Boater’s World.
Boater’s World has stores in 27 states.
The retailer says prices have been cut by up to 30 percent on more than $100 million worth of inventory. The chain is also hoping to sell store fixtures and equipment.
The going-out-of-business sale is being managed by Hilco Merchant Resources and Gordon Brothers Group.
The liquidation will not impact Ritz Camera’s retail business, which the company says continues to operate under Chapter 11 reorganization.

Friday, March 20, 2009

Great Lakes News....

Thanks to a significant increase in funding for dredging on the Great Lakes in FY08, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was finally able to start reducing the backlog of sediment that is clogging the Great Lakes Navigation System announced Great Lakes Maritime Task Force in its 2008 Annual Report released March 20.“Congress really stepped up to the plate and gave the Corps nearly $140m to dredge Great Lakes ports and waterways in FY08. As a result, for the first time in many years, the Corps could both remove all the sediment that builds up in the course of a year and actually start to chip away at the 18 million cubic yards that remain.”The outlook for FY09 initially was not as positive. The Bush Administration’s final budget proposed to slash the Lakes’ dredging appropriation by nearly $50m. “Thanks to the Great Lakes delegation, the omnibus bill did bring the Lakes’ dredging appropriation back up to $125m, an increase of $35m over what the Bush Administration had proposed. The economic stimulus package may also include some additional funds for Lakes dredging.”The Task Force stressed the need to jump start the economy makes the dredging crisis even more of a millstone around the nation’s neck. “The economic stimulus bill wisely chose to use American-made goods and materials to the degree possible, but most of the steel made in our country begins as iron ore and fluxstone that moves on the Great Lakes. Every ton of iron ore that stays on the loading dock means less steel and fewer new jobs. Every ton of aggregate or cement that is left lessens our ability to promote and sustain economic growth.”The dredging crisis can be solved if the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund (HMTF) is used for its intended purpose – dredging deep-draft ports and waterways. The fund has a surplus of nearly $5b. “The Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund (that’s where the Port Use Tax revenues go) takes in about $1.1b a year, yet withdrawals are only about $700m a year. The excess – now nearly $5b – is used to paper balance the budget. Jim Weakley, our 2nd Vice President in 2008 and President of Lake Carriers’ Association, testified in Washington about the need to use the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund for its intended purpose. Fortunately, more and more members of Congress are getting the message: We can maintain our nation’s deep-draft ports and waterways if we spend what the taxpayer puts into the HMTF each year.”The dredging crisis was the focus of GLMTF’s 13th Annual Informational Briefing for the Great Lakes Delegation in Washington on April 2, 2008. The keynote address was given by Daniel J. Cornillie, Manager – Marine and Raw Materials Logistics for ArcelorMittal U.S.A. – Indiana Harbor. ArcelorMittal is America’s largest steelmaker, with about 21,000 employees who make about 25 percent of the nation’s steel.“More than half of ArcelorMittal U.S.A.’s jobs are in facilities immediately adjacent to the Great Lakes,” said Cornillie. “This is not a coincidence. The Great Lakes link the iron ore and stone from the north with the coal to the south. We require approximately 26 million tons per year of Lake-delivered raw materials to sustain ArcelorMittal’s production and jobs in just its U.S. Lakes mills. That is approximately 3,000 tons of material per hour, 24/7.”The dredging crisis is directly affecting ships delivering raw materials to ArcelorMittal’s complex in Indiana Harbor. “Twenty years ago, our time-chartered M/V JOSEPH L. BLOCK, for example, was carrying summertime loads of approximately 41,000 tons. Last summer, on the same runs, she carried less than 35,000 tons. She has to make six trips to deliver what she did in five. This math is being repeated across the U.S.-Flag Lakes fleet.”Cornillie pointed out that the cost to restore the Great Lakes Navigation System to project dimensions (more than $200m) would be less than half that recently spent on reconfiguring one freeway intersection south of Chicago.GLMTF has already begun working on its recommendations for the FY10 dredging budget. “We cannot address every need in one year or one budget, but we must not let what we accomplished in FY08 become just a highlight. It must become that standard against which we are now measured.”Founded in 1992, Great Lakes Maritime Task Force promotes domestic and international shipping on the Great Lakes. It is the largest coalition to ever speak for the Great Lakes shipping community and draws its membership from both labor and management representing U.S.-Flag vessel operators, shipboard and longshore unions, port authorities, cargo shippers, terminal operators, shipyards and other Great Lakes interests. Its goals include restoring adequate funding for dredging of Great Lakes deep-draft ports and waterways, construction of a second Poe-sized lock at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan; protecting the Jones Act and other U.S. maritime cabotage laws and regulations; maximizing the Lakes overseas trade; and opposing exports and increased diversions of Great Lakes water.

Thursday, March 19, 2009

TWIC Head Count....

One million port and longshore workers, truckers and others at ports across the nation have enrolled in the Department of Homeland Security's Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) program. The program's goal is to ensure that any individual who has unescorted access to secure areas of port facilities and vessels has received a thorough background check and is not a known security threat.Today, 36 of the 42 Captain of the Port Zones across the country require workers to have a TWIC. All ports must be in compliance with credential requirements by April 14, 2009. Port security personnel are trained to ensure workers have valid cards and Coast Guard officials are conducting random compliance inspections at these ports.More than 150 fixed enrollment centers will ultimately vet more than 1.2 million maritime transportation system workers by the April deadline. In addition to fixed sites, more than 450 mobile enrollment sites have been deployed, registering workers at locations convenient to their places of employment.Workers are able to pre-enroll for TWIC online at www.tsa.gov/twic or the Coast Guard's Homeport site, http://homeport.uscg.mil/. Pre-enrolling speeds up the process by allowing workers to provide biographic information and schedule a time to complete the application process in person. This eliminates waiting at enrollment centers and reduces the time it takes to enroll.

Cosco Busan Pilot to Jail......

John Joseph Cota, a California ship pilot, pleaded guilty on March 6 to negligently causing the discharge of approximately 53,000 gallons of oil into San Francisco Bay in violation of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, a law enacted in the wake of the Exxon Valdez disaster. Cota, who piloted the M/V Cosco Busan when it hit the San Francisco Bay Bridge on Nov. 7, 2007, also pleaded guilty to violation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act for the death of protected migratory birds.If the plea terms are accepted by U.S. District Court Judge Susan Illston, Cota will be sentenced to serve between two and ten months in prison and be fined between $3,000 to $30,000. The exact sentence will be determined by the court with the government reserving the right to argue for the highest sentence within this range. The plea also requires Cota to serve the maximum one year of supervised release during which he will not serve as a ship pilot or ship Captain (Master). Sentencing has been scheduled for June 19, 2009."Today's guilty plea is a reminder that the Cosco Busan crash was not just an accident, but a criminal act," said John C. Cruden, Acting Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division. "This is not a case involving a mere mistake. The lesson here is that environmental stewards, who abandon ship, act negligently and cause major environmental damage will be vigorously prosecuted."

Survey at Shilsole with the Commodore


On the job yesterday with Commodore Duncun on the MV Turning Point -

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

WSF News

Guido Perla & Associates, Inc. (GPA), a leading US Naval Architecture and Marine, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Firm, founded in 1979 and headquartered in Seattle, WA, was again selected by Todd Pacific Shipyards in Seattle and approved by Washington State Ferries (WSF) to deliver the final design and production engineering for a 64-car ferry after completing the final design for the WSF 144-car ferry in November of 2008. The 64-car ferry, intended to carry 750 passengers and 64 standard autos, will incorporate all of the latest USCG requirements for Safety and Security. Washington State Ferries is the largest ferry system in the United States and the third largest in the world, transporting over 24 million passengers annually. GPA’s relevant design experience includes the SOLAS certified passenger vessels M/V Empress of the North and M/V Coastal Queen, as well as the M/V Susitna, also known as the E-Craft, a high speed ferry capable of carrying 20 vehicles currently under construction at Alaska Ship & Drydock for the Office of Naval Research. GPA also provided regulatory approval drawings and detailed construction engineering for the Pierce County vehicle ferry M/V Steilacoom II, built by Nichols Brothers Boat Builders and Todd Pacific Shipyard and was the Owner’s Naval Architect for the design and construction of the M/V Stikine vehicle ferry.

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Use Old Medical Forms Anyway.......

Until further notice NO NOT DESTROY any of your old physical forms. Rumor has it that NMC put the new ones on the web BY MISTAKE, and no body wants to take responsibility for the "oops". Supposedly the new forms on the web are a DRAFT only.

Monday, March 16, 2009

New merchant Mariner Medical Requirements

From our friend Norleen Schumer at www.maritimelicensing.com -

Here are a couple of new items of interest for you. You may have already ready received the information concerning the new Federal Register.
The new Federal Register for "Consolidation of Merchant Mariner Qualification Credentials" Final Rule. Federal Register/Vol. 74, No. 49/Monday, March 16, 2009/Rules and Regulations
There are two new physical forms posted on the CG website that you should be aware of that meet the new requirements in the Medical NVIC 04-08:
Merchant Marine Personnel Physical Examination Report (Form CG-719K) 9 pages
Merchant Marine Certification of Fitness for Entry Level Ratings (Form CG-719K/E) 2 pages

Washing Machine Weather...


Sea state chart for today - reported in meters....that's an eight off the coast -

Sunday, March 15, 2009

Friday, March 13, 2009

On Hold at NMC........

Message:



The USCG National Maritime Center is experiencing problems with our phone system, which is impacting calls coming into the Mariner Information Call Center. We are working with the Coast Guard's Electronic Support Detachment and the telephone company to correct this problem as fast as possible. Until the problem is resolved, callers may experience a busy signal or longer than normal wait times while calling the 1-888-IASKNMC phone number. You may still contact us via email at IASKNMC@USCG.MIL or by calling one of the 17 Regional Exam Centers. Contact information for the Regional Exam Centers can be found at http://www.uscg.mil/nmc/rec_information.asp. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Captain David C. Stalfort

Commanding Officer

U.S. Coast Guard National Maritime Center

100 Forbes Drive

Martinsburg, WV 25404

Thursday, March 12, 2009

46 CFR 10.422 Seatime Requirements

In yesterday's post - 46 CFR 10.422 was mentioned - so here it is....

46 CFR 10.422

§10.422 Tonnage limitations and qualifying requirements for licenses as master or mate of vessels of not more than 200 gross tons.


(a) Except as noted in paragraph (e), all licenses issued for master or mate of vessels of not more than 200 gross tons are issued in 50 gross ton increments based on the applicant’s qualifying experience. The license is limited to the maximum tonnage on which at least 25 percent of the required experience was obtained, or 150 percent of the maximum tonnage on which at least 50 percent of the service was obtained, whichever is higher. Limitations are in multiples of 50 gross tons using the next higher figure when an intermediate tonnage is calculated. (b) The tonnage limitation on these licenses may be raised upon completion of: (1) At least 45 days of additional service on deck on a vessel of a higher tonnage for a tonnage increase on a mate’s license; or, (2) At least 90 days of additional service on deck on a vessel of a higher tonnage for a tonnage increase on a master’s license; or, (3) Additional service, which, when combined with all previously accumulated service, will qualify the applicant for a higher tonnage license under the basic formula; or, (4) Six months additional service in the deck department on vessels within the highest tonnage increment on the license. In this case, the tonnage limitation may be raised one increment. (c) When the service is obtained on vessels upon which licensed personnel are not required, the OCMI must be satisfied that the nature of this qualifying service (i.e., size of vessel, route, equipment, etc.) is a reasonable equivalent to the duties performed on vessels which are required to engage licensed individuals. (d) Service gained in the engineroom on vessels of not more than 200 gross tons may be creditable for up to 25 percent of the deck service requirements for mate. (e) When the qualifying service is obtained upon vessels of five gross tons or less, the license will be limited to vessels of not more than 25 gross tons.


§10.424 Service requirements for master of ocean steam or motor vessels of not more than 200 gross tons.


(a) The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for a license as master of ocean steam or motor vessels of not more than 200 gross tons is: (1) Three years total service on ocean or near coastal waters. Service on Great Lakes and inland waters may substitute for up to 18 months of the required service. Two years of the required service must have been as master, mate, or equivalent supervisory position while holding a license as master, as mate, or as operator of uninspected passenger vessels; or, (2) Two years total service as a licensed master or mate of ocean or near-coastal towing vessels. Completion of a limited examination is also required. (b) In order to obtain an endorsement on this license for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must submit evidence of 12 months of service on sail or auxiliary sail vessels. The required 12 months of service may have been obtained prior to issuance of the master’s license. (c) In addition to any required examination, the applicant must comply with the requirements listed in §10.401(g) of this subpart.


§10.426 Service requirements for master of near coastal steam or motor vessels of not more than 200 gross tons.


(a) The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for a license as master of near coastal steam or motor vessels of not more than 200 gross tons is: (1) Two years total service on ocean or near coastal waters. Service on Great Lakes and inland waters may substitute for up to one year of the required service. One year of the required service must have been as a master, mate, or equivalent supervisory position while holding a license as master, as mate, or as operator of uninspected passenger vessels; or, (2) One year of total service as licensed master or mate of towing vessels on oceans or near-coastal routes. Completion of a limited examination is also required. (b) In order to obtain an endorsement on this license for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must submit evidence of 12 months of service on sail or auxiliary sail vessels. The required 12 months of service may have been obtained prior to issuance of the master’s license.


§10.427 Service requirements for mate of near coastal steam or motor vessels of not more than 200 gross tons.


(a) The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for license as mate of near coastal steam or motor vessels of not more than 200 gross tons is: (1) Twelve months total service in the deck department of ocean or near coastal steam or motor, sail, or auxiliary sail vessels. Service on Great Lakes and inland waters may substitute for up to six months of the required service; or, (2) Three months of service in the deck department of steam or motor vessels operating on ocean, near coastal, Great Lakes or inland waters while holding a license as master of inland steam or motor, sail or auxiliary sail vessels of not more than 200 gross tons. (b) The holder of a license as operator of uninspected passenger vessels with a near coastal route endorsement may obtain this license by successfully completing an examination on rules and regulations for small passenger vessels. (c) In order to obtain an endorsement on this license for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must submit evidence of six months of deck service on sail or auxiliary sail vessels. (d) A license as master of near coastal steam or motor vessels may be endorsed as mate of sail or auxiliary sail vessels upon presentation of three months of service on sail or auxiliary sail vessels. (e) In order to obtain a tonnage endorsement of over 100 gross tons, the applicant must complete the additional examination topics indicated in subpart I of this part.


§10.428 Service requirements for master of near coastal steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons.


(a) The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for a license as master of near coastal steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons is two years total service in the deck department of steam or motor, sail, or auxiliary sail vessels on ocean or near coastal waters. Service on Great Lakes and inland waters may substitute for up to one year of the required service. (b) In order to obtain an endorsement on this license for sail or auxiliary sail vessels, the applicant must submit evidence of 12 months of service on sail or auxiliary sail vessels. The required 12 months of service may have been obtained prior to issuance of the license.


§10.429 Service requirements for limited master of near coastal steam or motor vessels of not more than 100 gross tons.


(a) Limited masters’ licenses for near coastal vessels of not more than 100 gross tons may be issued to applicants to be employed by organizations such as yacht clubs, marinas, formal camps and educational institutions. A license issued under this section is limited to the specific activity and the locality of the yacht club, marina or camp. In order to obtain this restricted license, an applicant must: (1) Have four months of service on any waters in the operation of the type of vessel for which the license is requested; (2) Satisfactorily complete a safe boating course approved by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators, or a safe boating course conducted by the U.S. Power Squadron or the American Red Cross.

Upgrade to Master 200 Course

Zenith Maritime has scheduled an Upgrade Master 100 ton to no more than Master 200 ton license training course for late April at Fishermen's Terminal - Seattle. This will be a weekday 32-hour training (0800 - 1700) starting April 27th and concluding on May 1. All license exams will be taken in class. Mariners can use the following table to determine the seatime requirements for upgrade in tonnage. For more information contact john@zenithmaritime.com -

Upgrade M100 to M200 (Inland - Near Coastal)

This course is for increasing tonnage from 100 to 200 where a test would be required. This course does not mean that you will automatically be approved for a tonnage increase. (see below) -Increase in Scope - Endorsement Master 100 to 150 GRT then to 200 GRT- 46 CFR 10.422

While holding a license as 100 GRT you can sail 90 days on a vessel of a higher tonnage (over 101 GRT) which will raise the tonnage on your current license to the next highest increment of 150 OR

While holding a license as 100 GRT you can sail 6 months on deck on vessels within the highest tonnage increment on the license will also raise the tonnage on your current license to the next highest increment of 150 GRT.

While holding 150 GRT you must sail 90 days on a vessel of a higher tonnage (over 151 GRT) which will raise the tonnage on your current license to the next highest increment of 200 OR

While holding a license of 150 GRT sailing 6 months on deck on vessels within the highest tonnage increment on the license will raise the tonnage on your current license to the next highest increment of 200 GRT.

Safe Boating America OUPV Course

Bethpage, NY - Just got word that several mariners have passed all their license exams - congratulations ! Chris and I greatly enjoyed the experience....

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Ballard Locks Warning

The small lock will be drained and down for maintenance until March 20th.

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

CV 63


KITTY HAWK IN HEAVY SEAS .....!!!!!

Its not often you see an aircraft carrier take seas over the bow.

To put it in perspective, the deck is 102 feet off the water when docked.

You can see the ship shudder when it hits them (camera wiggle).

Seattle Upgrade to Master 200 Training...

We are delivering a 5-day Seattle Upgrade Master 100 to NMT 200 ton class starting April 27th at Fishermen's Terminal. For more information - email info@zenithmaritime.com

Monday, March 9, 2009

AWOL in Bethpage, NY.....


I have been away from my computer for the past few days - been back in Bethpage, NY helping Capt Richard Werner and his team at Safe Boating America with their first OUPV class. What a great bunch of mariners - all 17.
First rate class - first rate trainers!!

Wednesday, March 4, 2009

Good Day in Ballard....


Finished up with exams in my Seattle M100 class last night - everyone passed on the first round. Congratulations to Greg, Nate, Rob, Max, Gerald, Ben, Wayne, and Ron.
Job well done!

I will be off to New York tomorrow morning to finish up a 6-pak class at our new training partner's deluxe classroom in Bethpage...for those mariners in need of license training in New York ... contact Richard at http://www.safeboatingamerica.com/

Monday, March 2, 2009

Bad Fasteners....

From a recent survey where stray current in the bilge wasted a bunch of bronze fastenings -

NON STANDARD CONDITIONS AND OBSERVATIONS:
The following Observations and or Non-Standard Conditions were noted at the time of survey:
NVIC 8-95 was used as guidance in the inspection of the vessel described herein.
The vessel has been open moored in fresh water with the machinery, bilge, and cabin spaces generally accessible but materially limited in the forecastle, beneath machinery space, in after cabin, and at the transom.
Vessel’s hull and underbody was found to be in generally good condition. Hull top-sides, foredeck, and interior appear to be good condition and structurally sound (given the survey limitations as mentioned herein) with no signs of grounding or other damage and or structural failure except as follows.
The vessel described herein is a manufactured model therefore the undersigned has made no opinion herein as to the design, scantlings, workmanship, and or materials except as to modifications and or repairs.
Bronze hull fasteners (#12 – 1-3/8” wood screws) were drawn from various locations at the vessel’s underbody and examined (visually under optical magnification) and found to be in serviceable condition with the threads sharp with marginal visible alloy breakdown with the exception of the underbody hull fasteners at the garboard seam which generally showed serious wastage due to stray current corrosion. The cause of which was traced to 12-volt DC wiring in contact with bilge water. The undersigned strongly advises that all electrical wiring be inspected and repaired – replaced as required to prevent stray current. New #12 – 1-1/2” bronze fasteners were installed where a (wasted) fastener was removed. When installed - new fasteners properly tighten up in the keel timber. The undersigned strongly advises that the garboard fasteners be thoroughly inspected for wastage should be replaced where required within the foreseeable future to ensure the seaworthiness of the vessel. Refastening should begin at garboard plank at the keel on both beams. Open up, examine, and replace existing original and or wasted hull fasteners with same size (approximately #12 – 1-1/2’) and correct length marine-grade bronze wood screws. Over-size fasteners should only be used those instances when a new fastener will not properly tighten up. Sister fastening should only be used when an existing fastener cannot be removed without causing damage to the wood hull – frame structure. A sister fastener should only be fitted when it does not compromise the adjacent wood structure, (that is – to cause cracking, splitting, or create a weak spot). In the event that good serviceable fasteners are found and documented (for example, working from an area of non-serviceable fasteners into an adjoining area where the vast majority of existing fasteners are visually free of wastage and alloy break down), then scheduled refastening may be dispensed with in that specific area only. In the event that damaged, soft, weakened, or decayed (rot fungi) wood is discovered, the nature and extent of which must be determined. Any replacement or repair to existing wood structure(s) should be reviewed by a competent shipwright.
The vessel has been re-fastened in localized areas (the extent of which is unknown) of the hull with marine-grade silicon bronze wood screws.
The vessel’s keel bolts, where accessible, were visually inspected and hammer punched – filed to observe the condition of the underlying material. They were found to be serviceable with the following observation. Areas of rust deposits were observed at the keel. The undersigned believes that these rust deposits are from the vessel’s steel keel bolts. The condition of the vessel’s fasteners should be re-examined during the vessel’s next scheduled haul out. As with any wood yacht – the condition of the hull and structural fasteners should be regularly examined and replaced as required by a competent shipwright.
The entire vessel, all planking was fair-to-the-eye with no apparent rattling or loose planking. Underbody should be re-coated with a marine grade anti-fouling paint.
Portside underbody amidships – the hammer tone changed slightly in the area of the 1st and 3rd broad planks in the area of a bronze thru-hull fitting. No soft or decayed wood was visually observed. The undersigned recommends that this area be examined during the vessel’s next scheduled haulout.
Starboard underbody amidships – the hammer tone changed slightly in the area of the 3rd and 4th broad planks. No soft or decayed wood was visually observed. The undersigned recommends that this area be examined during the vessel’s next scheduled haulout.
An area of weather deck (wood) at the starboard quarter was found to be weak (allowing the ingress of water into the cabin’s interior) and should be repaired with marine grade materials in accordance with marine industry repair practices.
At the transom, upper most outboard areas – soft and decayed wood planking was observed which should be repaired with marine grade materials in accordance with marine industry repair practices.
When hauled, the vessel’s sacrificial zincs were found to be wasted. New zincs were fitted on the prop shafts, trim tabs, and rudders prior to re-launching
Water was found in the bilge.
The undersigned had a limited - restricted view of the stuffing boxes for both the propeller and rudder shafts due to limited access. In addition, various areas of the vessel’s structure could not be view due to limited access caused by interior fixtures, ceiling, and decks – soles, forecastle, stern, machinery, and stowed items which precluded a more complete or even partial inspection process.

Sunday, March 1, 2009

Net Sheds....


At Fishermen's Terminal in Seattle....the boat basin is home to the Alaska fishing fleet - one of the joys of teaching at the Terminal is watching the crews repair nets in the off season. A large paved area just outside the classroom is used as a lay-down area for net repair. Surrounding the yard is the net sheds which are used to store nets in the off season.